July Antiracist Read: So You Want to Talk about Race, by Ijeoma Oluo

July Antiracist Read: So You Want to Talk About Race, by Ijeoma Oluo

(Image via Brave and Kind Books)

My July antiracist read was So You Want to Talk About Race, by Ijeoma Oluo. I experienced this book via the audiobook, which the author read herself.

Here is some information about the book, from Brave and Kind Books:

Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy–from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans–has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair–and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend?

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life. (Source)

I learned so much from this book, and found it especially powerful to experience it in the author’s own voice. No reflections from me about this text. Instead, below, you’ll find resources to learn directly from the author herself.

You can learn from Ijeoma Oluo everyday via her website, Twitter, and Instagram. These resoucres are valuable, but they are not a substitution for paying for the author’s work.


The antiracist read I’m attempting in August is I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness, by Austin Channing Brown.

I try my best, but not all of my antiracist thoughts and reflections make it to the blog. Find more on Instagram.


In 2020, I’m attempting to read at least one book each month specifically to help me on my antiracist journey. I’m not an expert, and I’m not a professional. You’re welcome to read and learn along with me, if you’d like.

Waking Up White, by Debby Irving
White Fragility, by Robin DiAngelo
Stamped – Racism, Antiracism, and You, by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi
This Book is Anti-Racist, by Tiffany Jewell and Aurélia Durand

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